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Posts tagged “politics

NSA: Ultimate Internet Spy Center


The NSA‘s new spy center will see everything

Imagine a massive supercomputer in the desert, watched around the clock by armed guards, capable of intercepting and decrypting virtually every piece of information in the world. Sounds like science fiction doesn’t it? Well, according to Wired, the NSA is in the process of building just such a place, and they’ve madeleaps and bounds of progress at breaking the standard AES encryption algorithm that keeps your emails and other private information secure.

This new surveillance center is being constructed in the Utah desert, near a town called Bluffdale. When it’s finished, you’ll be able to fit five US Capitols inside, and most of that space will be occupied by supercomputers capable of storing more data than you can even imagine (you can imagine a lot, can’t you?). Your private emails, Google searches, receipts, travel information – pretty much ever scrap of data generated – will be stored here, while sophisticated software sifts through it in search of anything remotely suspicious.

More on this interesting story here: http://www.neowin.net/news/the-nsas-new-spy-center-will-see-everything

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Six Most Dangerous Security Threats Coming out of RSA 2012


At the RSA conference in San Francisco, in the best attended of all 220 track sessions, the nation’s top penetration testing and incident handling expert, Ed Skoudis, and the director of the Internet Storm Center, Johannes Ullrich, discussed the six most dangerous new attack vectors that they saw being used in 2011 and also what has begun to emerge in 2012.

The Australian journalist who wrote this article did an extraordinary job of summarizing the presentation accurately and with enough fidelity to make you feel as if you had been there.

The six most dangerous infosec attacks

The most popular track session of RSA San Francisco for the past five years was again packed to the rafters.

Hundreds of delegates poured in to see the vivacious Ed Skoudis andJoannes Ullrich discuss the six most dangerous IT security threats of 2011 and to hear what to expect in the year ahead.

Skoudis, founder of Counter Hack Challenges and an incident responder for large organisations, kicked off the session at the 2012 RSA conference last week with three of the top security threats and how to defend against them.

Read about the six most dangerous attack here: http://www.scmagazine.com.au/News/292784,the-six-most-dangerous-infosec-attacks.aspx


Anonymous: Tricked Members Infected by Trojan DDOS Utility


The enemy of my enemy is my friend, right?

Victims of the various cyber-attacks by members of the hacktivist group Anonymous are undoubtedly enjoying a bit of schadenfreude this weekend, as a new report from Symantec indicates that some Anonymous members have been tricked into downloading and running a fairly unpleasant Trojan alongside one of their distributed denial-of-service tools.

“In these DDoS attacks, supporters using the Low Orbit Ion Cannon denial-of-service (DoS) tool would voluntarily include their computer in a botnet for attacks in support of Anonymous,” Symantec writes.

Image representing Symantec as depicted in Cru...

“In the wake Anonymous member arrests this week, it is worth highlighting how Anonymous supporters have been deceived into installing Zeus botnet clients purportedly for the purpose of DoS attacks. The Zeus client does perform DoS attacks, but it doesn’t stop there. It also steals the users’ online banking credentials, webmail credentials, and cookies.”

The Trojan problem’s a fairly recent occurrence, as it allegedly popped up the day after Anonymous members launched online counter-offensives in retaliation for the loss of the site Megaupload (and the international arrest of its key management). An anonymous user changed a download link on January 20 within one of the Pastebin-based “How to use Slowloris” tutorials, one of Anonymous’ DOS utilities, and pointed it to a Zeus botnet client instead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More Here: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401121,00.asp